• Finalizado
    FINAL
    2015-09-12
    Argentina 71
    Venezuela 76
  • Finalizado
    BRONCE
    2015-09-12
    Mexico 86
    Canada 87
  • Finalizado
    SEMIFINAL
    2015-09-11
    Argentina 78
    Mexico 70
  • Finalizado
    SEMIFINAL
    2015-09-11
    Canada 78
    Venezuela 79
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-09
    Mexico 95
    Argentina 83
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-09
    Uruguay 69
    Puerto Rico 80
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-09
    Dominicana 103
    Canada 120
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-09
    Panama 62
    Venezuela 75
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-08
    Mexico 73
    Canada 94
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-08
    Panama 71
    Puerto Rico 78
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-08
    Venezuela 75
    Uruguay 77
  • Finalizado
    Ronda 2
    2015-09-08
    Argentina 92
    Dominicana 84

Non-Traditional Parameters


There are some types of analysis. There are those based on cumulative valuation, linear weight measures, balance algorythms (also called algorythms plus/minus) and the pseudo-qualitative ones, also called influence-type algorythms or "wins"-type. There's a much more natural way to properly assess the player's performance, that is the mere average comparison, in which we obtain different types of "ratios".

The only ratio assumed to be generally accepted by the analysts and statisticians community different from those per-game and per complete game (40 or 48 minute) averages is the assists per turnover, which indicates the controlability degree for an external player, and yet it's not one hundred percent reliable, because it's not a hundred percent visible. Even more, possessions can be positive, neutral or negative.

Still, the analysis of different non-conventional ratios allows us to develop a player profile with a fairly high degree of accuracy even without having seen him playing ever. Here are some of them.

Points per rebound

Two points per rebound (in other words, half rebound per point) means barely the boundary between the external and the internal player. A player who scores more than two points per rebound tends to be an external player or at least he can play in the perimeter. Similarly a player who scores less than two points per rebound tends to be an internal player or at least he can play in the zone. This logic is met in the 90 percent of the cases.

Rebounds per block

An internal player could be considered a power forward or a center in terms of total rebounds per block shot. In the 75% of the cases, those who average less than 5 rebounds per block will tend to be centers. On the other hand, internals who average more than 8 rebounds per block will tend to be power-forwards in the 90% of the cases.

Assists per steal

The assist-per-steal ratio measures the degree of defensivity. Whereas steals-per-game ratio points us if the player can defend well or not, a player with more than five assists per steal tends in a 75% of the cases to not respect the principle of defensive balance. In other words, that player tends to be lazy -to be reluctant- to come back to defend and take his mark when the opposite point guard tries to move with the ball across the half court.

Points per three-point shot made

A player with more than 10 points per three-point shot made doesn't use it as a main weapon, which does not mean he could be an excellent three-point shooter in quantity and percentage. The external players tend in a 95 percent of the cases to score more than 30 percent of their points beyond the three-point line, in other words, more than a three-pointer for every 10 points, or less than 10 pts per 3-pointer made.

A player with more than 50 per cent of their points through triple (this is, less than six points per 3-point shot made) tends to have a limited ability to penetrate. There are flagrant cases of exceptional players with proven and successful careers with 5 or even with 4 points per three-point shot made, such are the cases of Leandro Masieri in Argentina (4671/1136 = 4.11), Nelson Quiñones in Puerto Rico (4373/1045, 4.18), Damon Jones in the NBA (4326/941 = 4.59), Jukka Toijala in Finnish Korisliiga (5623/1197 = 4.69) and right now Alberto Corbacho in ACB, but in his seven-year stint in LEB Oro had a register of 2102/485 = 4.33.


Matias Barmat (@worldhoopstats)

Lecturas: 813 - 2012-12-31